How your passwords can end up for sale on the dark web

Last month, Zoom joined a long list of companies whose user data has fallen prey to hackers. More than half a million account logins for the hugely popular video conferencing platform were discovered on the dark web, either offered for free or for next to nothing.

While some users may be tempted to blame the company for this, it’s actually part of a much bigger problem that involves hackers, a lawless corner of the internet and our own failure to choose better passwords.

Complete article at cnn.com

Beware of bad Santas this Xmas: Piles of insecure smart toys fill retailers’ shelves

It seems to come around quicker every year – the failure of so-called smart toys to meet the most basic of security requirements. Which? has discovered a bunch of sack fillers that dirtbags can use to chat to your kids this Christmas.

Back in 2017, the consumer group found toys with security problems relating to network connections, apps or other interactive features. The results of its latest round of testing show manufacturers are struggling to improve standards.

Complete Article on The Register

How Researchers Are Fighting Back Against Ransomware

For too long, cybercriminals have been raking in billions of dollars from businesses around the globe through the use of crypto-ransomware. This is a specific type of ransomware that uses encryption technology to ‘scramble’ the data of its victims. The victim is then instructed to pay a ransom, by a specific deadline, to have their data decrypted. The threat is increasing. Global losses have risen from $5 billion in 2017 to an anticipated $11.5 billion by the time 2019 is out. New variants such as Phobos and Ryuk are now making the news with Los Angeles IT Consulting firm DCG Inc. revealing, in a recent blog post, that Phobos increased its prevalence by 940% through 2019. Worrying times!

Complete Article on Cybrary